Christmas starts here

The number of broadcasting times  and variety of channels that broadcast the film already shows how important Aschenbrödel is for Germans.

The number of broadcasting times and variety of channels that broadcast the film already shows how important Aschenbrödel is for Germans.

 

Some things are important for Germans. So important that one of the biggest and most renowned newspapers publishes a table on it. If you are following German news or blogs, you might guess what I am talking about: Süddeutsche Zeitung’s service for Drei Haselnüsse für Aschenbrödel.

Drei Haselnüsse für Aschenbrödel. (Three Hazelnuts for Cinderella) is a Czechoslovak/East German fairy-tale film from 1973. Tři oříšky pro Popelku, as the movie is called in its original version (kind of awkward for Germans maybe since Popelku[h] means Boogercow in German but I am drifting off here), is one of the peculiarities of a German childhood Christmas. Most people will have watched this movie every year, maybe even more than once, and the soundtrack (that you should listen to) makes the typical German feel at least as Christmassy as when hearing the Silent-Night-tune. Every childhood Christmas, I remember sitting with my twin aunts who were teenagers then and who adored this movie.

One of the most interesting things with this holiday tradition is that the movie was made in Eastern Europe and premiered in East Berlin. Despite the West German orientation towards the U.S., the Czech films (that actually were Czech-East-German co-productions) were met with great enthusiasm and secured a spot in the hearts of the whole of Germany.  

So if you want to tyska till dig (“germanize yourself” in my friend Evelina’s words) this Christmas, I highly recommend cuddling up in front of your TV with a bowl of hazelnuts and this film. Above you find the mentioned table – so that no one misses these few opportunities now!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s