Buy local

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When I moved to Düsseldorf, I didn’t know which part of town would be best for me. My co-workers told me, “Move to Flingern, that would suit you”. Okay, I thought, and moved to Flingern. Ever since, I have wondered why my colleagues thought I should live in the hipster part of town where one overpriced furniture boutique is next to each other. I don’t frequent coffee shops, I don’t listen to hipster music, and I don’t own a Fjällräven Kånken.

Anyway, last weekend I finally realized why my hood is a good hood. Maybe I even embraced my inner politically correct eco hipster. I went to the bulk goods store – and I loved it! The store is only five minutes from my house and from the farmers’ market. Inspired by Zero Waste blogs, I got my tote bags, coffee tin and müsli container and felt like a really sustainable person.  The bulk goods store, in German we call it the “non-packaged-store”, is great fun – maybe it’s because it appeals to haptic senses? My friend Maike claims I spent 45 minutes in there (it felt like ten!). I grinded my own coffee (for guests, I don’t drink coffee), I bagged my own müsli and was surprisingly amazed during the process. Another advantage is that you can buy just as much as you need. I rarely need 200 grams of walnuts if I bake and use them as toppings. At the non-packaged-store, I can get 3 grams if I wish. But the best things is: I didn’t have to takeout my little plastic trash can that day!

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At the market, I bought a new kind of apple I’ve been looking for forever

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Another plus of the hipster hood: the awesome stationery store

Supply and demand

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I like abundance. Scarcity is not really my thing. That’s why I keep wondering if I live in the right country or the right part of the country because battles for space, a scarce ressource, seem to regularily occur in my life. On the train. At restaurants. In the streets. Or, like last Friday, at the movies.

I had already attempted to attend the local open air cinema two weeks ago. We arrived 5 minutes after they had opened the doors, just to find there was no way on earth we would get in. 90 seats, 200 people in line.  And that was half an hour before the movie even started. So I still have not seen “Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri”. In a way, it feels like back when I lived in a small town and had to wait for films to come out on DVD.

So this time, I was prepared. I told my friend Maike we had to be there early. We walked briskly to the venue, and I was in high spirits. Twenty minutes before the doors opened – surely we’d be among the first 90 ones. We arrived and the line was long, long. But I kept up my courage. Five minutes after admission started, two hipsters walked up to our part of the queue. The hipster girl, wearing a swimsuit and pants with dreadlocks, told us, “We counted and there is 90 people up to here”, pointing to seven people before us. “So I am sorry but you won’t get in. Anyone beyond that point won’t get in”.

The reactions to this verdict would have made great movie material themselves. The ladies behind us were certain that this was a joke and kept questioning the two hipsters in charge. “Are you saying this to make us leave so you two get a seat?” they even wondered, challenging their status as official admission staff. “No, we work here and the regulartory authorities are strict on this”, the male admission hipsters assured them. But to no avail – the 100 people still in line had formed a community of fate. We were not giving up our spots in the line.

As soon as people emerged from the building, voices asked “Are they leaving, are they?” The admission hipsters answered, sighing, “No, they are going to – the – bathroom! The space really is full already”. A man poked his head out from the theatre. “There is a free seat next to me!” he announced. “Someone can sit next to me!” This is pretty much like the lifeboats on the Titanic, I thought. Better get that last seat. Children and women first! The admission hipsters were not having any of it though. “If the seat is still free when the movie starts, we can talk about it. Maybe someone just went to – the – bathroom!” The lady who had already gotten her hopes up for the seat called after the man, “Put your hat on the seat!” Titanic. Lifeboats.

The situation was hopeless, we could have left. It was less our belief to obtain a seat than the highly entertaining scenes in the queue that kept us waiting. In lieu of popcorn, we began eating our melon snack. “Are you a press represenative?” we heard the admission hipster ask a woman. I stole a glance at my friend and said conspiratorial to Maike, “You’re a journalist! Maybe if you get out your press card…” But then the unexpected happened. The swimsuit girl appeared, informing the waiting crowd that it seemed there were four seats left. There was a couple before us and a Japanese girl. But we were two. The suspense was unbearable – how would this play out? Would the girl give up her seat? (After all this waiting, unlikely.) Would Maike sit on my lap? (For the entire 2 hours and 5 minutes? Not feasible.) It felt like a dream, like a very unlikely fantasy when the male hipster reappeared and announced the happy ending of this scarcity ordeal: “There are exactly five seats left now. Get in”.

Oh, and by the way, the movie was great, too.

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4 Things that are abundant in Dizzelland of Plenty

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Since I moved to Düsseldorf more than two (?!) years ago, I’ve been observing the peculiarities of this city. There are some things that are scarce here (unpopulated green areas and sensible drivers) but there are also things that are extraordinarily abundant in Dizzel.

  1. Hairdressers

Given that I struggle with finding a hairdresser that really suits me, you would think maybe there is just not that much choice. But on the contrary, the density of hairdressers in Düssseldorf is absolutely amazing. I have lived in a few places, and also in, let’s say, place where vanity fairs were definitely going on. But never have I noticed so many hairdressers in a city. If I walk 500 metres from my house, I pass 5 hairdressers. By the time I get to work, I probably have seen around 27.

  1. Post boxes

This might not be relevant to the digital native super modern person. But for me who writes letters with real stamps, Düsseldorf is post box heaven. Turn left and walk 2 minutes – there’s your post box. Oh, you’d rather walk right for 4 minutes? Voila your little yellow box that will accept your love letter. In Germany, this is very unsual – usually you have to google before where there could possibly still be a place to leave your letters. Not in Düsseldorf. Here, post box anxiety is not an issue.

  1. Cars

Sometimes I feel like Düsseldorf is stuck in the Fifties. In a time before the green party was a thing, before we realized maybe cities should be for human beings and not only for automobiles. There are so many cars in Düsseldorf, even people who visit me comment on it. Because of a crazy amount of car commuters, the population seems to have completely accepted that traffic jams are God-given. I try to survive between all the steel. But sometimes I can hardly breathe.

  1. Well-dressed people

Germany does not have a particularily high standard when it comes to style and when I rate fashion choices, I compare them to Sweden. The fact that Düsseldorfers manage to regularily rank high in that comparison should say a lot. It is certainly mostly around the inner city and it’s boulevards, but there some people, especially ladies, know how to dress. Sometimes it’s a joy to look at!

 

Thirty

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I think my doctor jinxed it. Last Monday when I came to see her for some lab result, she said, “You look splendid!” Less than 48 hours later, I was in bed with a terrible cold, not looking splendid at all anymore.

If you wondered how I spent my 30th birthday, you now know: I sneezed, I coughed, I endured a headache, and yes, I felt a bit sorry for myself. Thankfully, there were factors that alleviated the misery. Like the unexpected flower delivery from Sweden, the fact that A had taken the day off and spent it with me, or the enormous rose bouquet my choir gave me.

The next days I spent actively working on improving my health. I know that a cold takes seven to ten days regardless of what you do (I mean, I’ve had like 4 colds in three months now so I am an experienced sufferer). But I still made ginger shots (without alcohol, obviously), drank hot lemon tea and took a hot bath with eukalyptus. “Until Saturday, I will stick to home remedies”, I informed A. “Because for the weekend, I need to be able to have another level of escalation, a chemical weapon”. He looked at me as if my cold was Kim Jong Un.

But I had to be on my feet on Saturday. Because on Saturday, the party that I had been planning for 18 months would finally happen. The celebration that I had hashtagged #statthochzeit, which means instead of a wedding. The festivity that would bring together nearly 100 guests from all over Europe. The birthday bash that should mark my entering my glorious 30s.

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A helped me get these amazing balloons

It was quite a happening, and I could be part of it thanks to Aspirin Complex. My friends Malin, Michelle, Ingrid and Axel who arrived a day before helped me with all the preparations, blowing up 80 balloons, ordering me to rest and save my energy for the night, transporting rum in a shopping cart and (this was a surprise to me) installing a photo booth.

And then it all happened. You would think as a professional event manager I would be able to visualize 100 people but I kept being amazed when more and more and more guests poured into the party location I had rented. So many friends from all walks of life, my parents, my stepsister, a bunch of “my” juniors, my former intern and my entire maternal family. People I had not seen for years, friends I just made a year ago, and companions that have known me since I was small.

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This is my mom and her sisters. They rewrote the lyrics to “Thank you for the music” and performed a song for and about me. Don’t you wish you had a family like mine?

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These two held a wonderful speech

The brain is, I learned, designed to be able to take in groups of 20 people. Maybe that is why I remember what people said to me but not who said it. Perhaps it’s why I kept feeling I was falling short of actually socializing with everyone who had come all the way to Dizzel for me. But that’s okay because the guests told me afterwards that they had great conversations with each other and how great the music was (thanks to always-amazing DJ Ingrid who never let the dance floor get empty even for just a minute). Upon leaving, more than one requested that I’d have another party like this when I turn 35. (Spoiler alert: I will need to recover from this until I am 50.)

The morning after, we had brunch with those who had travelled from outside of Dizzel. Despite two hours of sleep and a cold, I made it through brunch and through cleaning up the party place (thanks to the help of A, Ingrid and my cousin Felix), but at 6 p.m. I fell asleep.

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So. many. presents. And that’s actually not even all of them. Thank you!

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I let go of my age by releasing these balloons into the sky. Deep symbolism, eh?

 

Hanner!

“Did you grow?” “Has your voice gotten higher?” “You’re like a totally different person?!”

Those were the things my friend Hanna uttered yesterday when she came to Düsseldorf to see me after more than five years. We met when studying in Bremen and instantly connected over the fact that people mispronounced our names (calling her Hanner and me Helln). Then, I moved to Sweden and she moved to Korea. Yesterday, she came all the way to see me: after a 20+ hour-journey, she got on a train through half of Germany to see me for one night. That’s what I call friendship committment!

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We went to Gill’s, the bar where I am kind of a regular (let’s say he still recognizes me though it’s been a while)

She experienced what Ingrid calls a dizzelpointment: After a few minutes in downtown, she asked me, “Shouldn’t Düsseldorf be, ehm, like prettier?” We all wish that but instead of taking her to nice tourist spots, I took her home and served her German Abendbrot, something that only an expat German like Hanna can fully appreciate. It’s difficult to catch up on 5 years in a few hours, but we did our best and had a wonderful night. When she had to leave at 7 a.m. this morning, I was so sad to already see her go. But I myself had to get going too because today I spent in Frankfurt, hosting one of my four biggest annual events.

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This also happened this week: my extra co-worker got a hairdresser to come during lunch hours and she cut half of the office’s hair, including mine.

P.S.: It is Nobel Week! As a Nobel nerd, I loved when someone at my event asked during lunch if the laureate for literature had been announced. And what an announcement: ever since I read “The Remains of the Day” in class 12 years ago, I’ve said that it won’t take too long until Kazuo Ishiguro will be awarded the Nobel Prize. I won my bet today – and I still know the first sentence of that novel by heart.

Zons

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“Where did you go, to the zone?” is what my friend Maike asked when I told her about my most recent endeavor to acquaint myself with the Dizzel surroundings. Zons, the name of the village we visited, sounds a bit like zone or Zonis which is what the people living in the GDR were, ironically, called. Zons does not have the least to do with all that, though.

The reason I knew about Zons is Lil’ Pesto’s girlfriend who a few months ago took Lil’ Pesto on a romantic bike tour there. We skipped the athletic part with the bike and went there on a Saturday afternoon which in itself, to me, felt very adult and thus super accomplished to me. I rarely feel I have my life together to the extent that I can do anything else but clean and cook on Saturdays. And now look at me, adulting all over the place.  

Zons was formely known as Fortress Zons which already hints at why the 5,000-people-place with town rights exists: In 1372 the Archbishop of Cologne moved the Rhine toll castle upstream to Zons protecting it with walls and moats and granting Zons town privileges in 1373. Big deal back then!

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Below the mill, there is a giant field of nessles. Don’t fall, I guess.

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I will remember Zons as the town of pretty window shutters.

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Apple Pie and Coffee. Many adult, such grown up, much mature, wow. Also notice the real old people in the background.

Nowadays you can walk around the fortified Friedestrom Castle and marvel at the old mill or enjoy meandering on the dike next to the Rhine that almost feels like home, i.e. Northern Germany.

After visiting all sights, the church (including a wedding with a Schützenverein), the mill, the castle, the tourist information, and writing postcards, our adultness culminated in getting coffee and cake at the market square (that might have been the size of my apartment because Zons is tiny).

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Zons even has adorable sheep

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Norddeich or Zons?

Two years in the Far West

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How far is it to Duisburg, Köln and Dortmund where my friends reside? (Like, for real, not what bahn.de wants me to believe.)

Where does one find Swedish kanelbullar for fika? Which cinema is cozy and beautiful like Passage Kino or Abaton? Which museum comes up with the most unexpected exhibitions? Which part of town is like Uhlenhorst, Winterhude, Kungsholmen and Östermalm?

Which bar does one go to to live that young urban professional lifestyle with rosé wine and slightly superficial conversation among smart looking people? And, who will be able to divert my attention from the large gap being away from Irreplacable Ingrid leaves?

Those were the questions I asked myself here exactly two years ago. Today marks my two-year-anniversary in Düsseldorf. It feels like time has flown by but also it feels like so much has happened. I know now that it is oh-too-far to Köln. I have turned into somewhat of a regular at the Bambi cinema. Uhlenhorst has become Pempelfort. And nobody, of course, has been able to replace Ingrid.

And, finally in 2017, my integration into the Rhineland has made significant progress. How I know that? Let’s see:

  1. I have learned what the Rhenish Dehnungs-i is

My co-workers smiled amused when I talked about Troisdorf the first time. (If you are wondering why I even talk about that place, they had an Ilon Wikland exhibit.) I pronounced it like it’s written, only to be answered, “Trooooosdorf, Helen!” My confused face was met with a lesson in Rhenian language: oi in this part of Germany is just a long o, not an oi. Now you know, in case you want to ask for the way to Grevenbroich.

2. I have installed the Rheinbahn app

I avoid taking public transportation in this city as much as I can. I am the one who cycles in pouring rain and minus 15 degrees. (Yes, I am exaggerating that, it never gets that cold here.) I hardly know the routes of the trams and busses. Sometimes, mostly when I have visitors who, surprisingly enough do not bring their bikes all the way to Dizzel, I have to take the train though. And every single time, for almost two years, I stood in front of the ticket machine only to find that it exclusively accepts coins. The whole thing with carrying cash is already a problem for me but who has 13,80 euro in coins? Time and again, this was a problem and there was some fare-dodging because I couldn’t pay with card or bills. Eventually, I surrendered and installed the Rheinbahn app. Now I can buy tickets on the phone. It’s great. It’s amazing. It’s made me a little more Düsseldorf.

3. Carnival

My integration is closely tied to Carnival. I remember telling my friends, “I’ll go all in for Carnival this year. If I hate that, too, I’ll break up with the Rhineland”. It was an ultimatum I gave my region of residence: If you’re at all interested in keeping me, give me a good Carnival experience. And, everyone knows that by now, Cologne delivered a great Carnival. (I’ll skip explaining the whole  controversy about going to the forbidden city.) Since Carnival, things kept going up – I even kind of don’t mind seeing the Rhine Tower when coming back from wherever I traveled to.

Now, I have become so integrated that I arrange my life around the Carnival dates. And I give people offended looks who seriously ask me if my 30th birthday party is colliding with Carnival. Only amateurs would not look up Shrove Monday before.